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Author Topic: Yeast bread rising.....  (Read 3613 times)
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Hawkeye
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« on: April 22, 2008, 08:55:39 AM »

I like making a skillet cake/english muffin over the open fire.
The recipe is simple but is a yest risen bread.

The problem I have is other than the middle of summer, how do I get the dough to rise properly?
Too close to the fire it starts cooking, too far, well it may as well be in the ice box.
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Veronica
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« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2008, 03:33:56 PM »

You know, this was one of the questions I was supposed to answer in that cooking class that I messed up the times on.  I'm still sorry about that!   Embarrassed  Wrap the dough bowl in a couple of linen towels that have been dipped in very hot water and wrung out.  Then set the bowl out of the wind.  Check on it every now and then and re-wrap with warm towels if necessary.  Works great.
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Hawkeye
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« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2008, 05:52:05 AM »

I"ve only used one towel....I'll have to try again with a couple.
I wonder if a wood box may help with keeping the temperature stable?
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Veronica
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« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2008, 09:35:24 AM »

It might and it definitely can't hurt!!
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Jim Harsh
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« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2008, 05:17:23 AM »

I wonder if a wood box may help with keeping the temperature stable?

A lot of bread or yeast risen dough recipes I have read says to let rise in a box.
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Hawkeye
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« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2008, 05:26:55 AM »

Did I hear that somewhere?   Cheesy

I did some looking into it after I posted....I may just do that.
The suggestin is not to use pine due to the properties of the wood, but rather use Poplar.

The dough boxes of the 19th c and early 20th c which are popular in antique stores right now are too big for me.
They are nice though as they have legs and double as a work surface.

Perhaps the size would be bearable if I make the legs to come out from their recessed joints then make canvas sack lining to placce other things inside for shipping....hummmmm
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